Developing: Ruth Matete picks the body of her husband for burial

Gospel artiste Ruth Matete picks the body of her husband John Apewajoye for burial at the Langata cemetery after prolonged dispute.

An outstanding medical bill of over Sh600,000 was one of the hurdles that prevented gospel artist Ruth Matete from burying her husband Blessed John Olakami Apewajoye, whose body has been lying at the Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) Mortuary since April.

Apewajoye died on April 11 while undergoing treatment at KNH for burns he sustained in a fire incident at their home in Athi River, Machakos County, on March 30.

Ms Matete’s lawyer, Mr Robert Odanga, on Monday confirmed to the Nation that as at Friday last week, the accrued bill was Sh677,000.

On June 8, the DCI formally requested to KNH to waive the body storage charges, but the hospital said it operates on a policy that prohibits waivers on the particular fee.

Ken Mijungu’s house swept clean by thugs

Former NTV news anchor Ken Mijungu’s house was swept clean by thugs who raided the residence twice.

Ken Mijungu. PHOTO| KEN MIJUNGU IG

In a post on Twitter, on Wednesday, July 22, he explained that the robbers even ripped off his curtains. 

He wrote: “Lightning don’t strike twice but thieves do, so the first time they broke my reinforced glass window with a sledge hummer or equivalent, carted away all electronics, weeks later they came with a pick-up, or Canter truck and carried away everything else, even ripped curtains off!”

His Twitter followers comforted him with a number saying a similar tragedy had also happened to them at one time.

Gibson Amenya wrote: Tough times brother but take heart my case was painful when I kept household items for a friend who was leaving the country only for vijana to break into my house and steal some.of items.Since he was an understood so I had to replace them lol

Kenyans online bash MP photographed repairing a shed

Kenyans online were not amused by Kimili MP Didmus Barasa who shared photos of him on top of a shed hammering in nails.

In what looked like public relations stunt, Mr. Barasa shared three photos of a shed whose walls also looked they needed a repair.

Below are the photos of the MP.

Mohammed Hersi of the Kenya Tourism Federation tweeted:” A member of parliament with a whole CDF kitty to boot.”

Another twitter user shared an old photo of Otiende Omollo also helping people repair a structure.

He captioned the photo: All our MPs try to help their constituents in many forms depending on their circumstances…as you can see here.

User GracieJohn27 said: I have not laughed, na sitacheka maendeleo.

Detectives arrest fraudster who has been masquerading as USAID boss

Detectives attached to the Directorate of Criminal Investigation (DCI) on Tuesday afternoon arrested a cyber crime suspect in Nairobi.

According to the police, Paul Mwangi Njihia, 29, has been conning members of the public while masquerading as the boss of United States Agency for International Development (USAID) in Kenya.

FAKE GATE PASSES

The suspect was arrested following investigations carried out by sleuths attached to the Oversees Criminal Investigation Office.

In a statement, the DCI said that the suspect is a former computer technology student at a local university who was purporting to be the General Manager USAID Kenya within the Rift Valley region.

“The student then went ahead and started obtaining facilitation fees from members of the public. His job seeking victims who were later issued with fake gate passes are reported to have sent a substantial amount as facilitation fees to a bank account linked to the suspect,” DCI said in a statement.

IMPERSONATION

Mr Njihia, the DCI said, is already in police custody and will be charged with obtaining money by false pretence and impersonation.

For months now, the office of the DCI has calling for caution from members of the public following increased incidents of cyber crime during this period of coronavirus pandemic.

By NN

The grief, double pain of losing one’s mother to Covid-19

I cannot wait for my quarantine days to be over so that I can mourn my mother. I will start wailing at the door.”

These were the painful words of Brenda Akinyi, 42, whose mother Ursula Buluma, a Kenya Ports Authority (KPA) employee, passed on at the Mombasa Hospital on April 2 and was buried the same day at Mbaraki cemetery.

Ms Buluma was the Coast region’s first Covid-19 fatality.

From her isolation bed at the Coast General Hospital in Mombasa, Ms Akinyi, who is eldest daughter of the Buluma family, said her mother’s death was as a result of “carelessness and negligence” by the hospital’s management.

“I’m yet to grieve. I didn’t see her body, nor attend her burial,” she said, adding: “My mother has been having health complications which she has lived with for years so when she called me on Wednesday March 25, to go to her house in Jomvu to take her to hospital, I did not find it strange because it was not the first time I was doing it.”

They went to Bandari Clinic, which is usually the first stop for KPA employees, where her mother was diagnosed with pneumonia and referred to Mombasa Hospital.

The KPA ambulance took them to hospital, “where my mother was first taken to the emergency section and put on oxygen,” Ms Akinyi says.

“However, she was removed from the intensive care unit and taken for what the hospital staff told me was screening the same day,” she said from her Rahimtulla isolation ward at CPGH.

She was later told that her mother would have to be taken to an isolation ward as they suspected that she had Covid-19.

She visited her mother on Friday and Saturday at the isolation ward, staying next to her on both days and chatting as usual. But when she returned on Sunday March 29, she was asked to stay away because her mother had tested positive.

Isolation centre “I was devastated. I also demanded to know why my mother was not put on pneumonia treatment at Mombasa Hospital as was directed by doctors from Bandari Clinic but nobody gave me an answer.”

According Ms Akinyi, doctors visited her home on Monday March 30, did some tests and left. They returned on Tuesday March 31, to pick her up.

She was first taken to the Kenya Medical Training College (KMTC) isolation centre in Mombasa before being moved to the Coast General Hospital on Tuesday April 1.

“I’ve been in quarantine for 10 days today and have not exhibited any symptoms. I’ve been in touch with my children back home, and none of them has exhibited any signs [of Covid-19], which leaves me very confused as to why exactly I’m here,” Ms Akinyi said.

“I’ve not been given any results from the tests they did before they took me to KMTC and thereafter in this isolation ward.

Forced quarantine

It’s very frustrating because I’m not aware of my condition. Am I on forced quarantine or under treatment?” she wondered.

Ms Akinyi’s children are under quarantine at the KMTC, Mombasa campus but given the poor condition of the facilities, the family transferred them to the Mombasa Beach Hotel, one of the quarantine centres at the coast.

According to her, life in isolation is tough because she is cut off physically from the rest of the world, depending on her mobile phone and internet connectivity to keep abreast of what is going on in the country and beyond.

“I’m in a self-contained room staring at the walls the whole day, without anyone to talk to or even a chance to bask in the sun,” she said.

Ms Akinyi said she wakes up every morning as early as 4am to browse the internet and check on friends on social media until 7am when her breakfast is served by hospital staff.

At 10am, she’s served with tea, at noon lunch, and four hours later, an evening cup of tea is wheeled into her room, before her dinner closes the daily meal routine at 7pm.

“They’ve made sure we have our meals on time. That is all we get here, mostly because one is rarely visited by a medical doctor,” Ms Akinyi said, adding that the medics talk to her on phone mainly to ask if she is exhibiting any symptoms.

“On the first day, I was given drugs to take for four days. I did not know what they were for but took them anyway. I have completed the dosage,” she says.

Fresh samples Ms Akinyi said fresh samples were taken from her on Tuesday April 7, but she is yet to get feedback, adding to the frustrations regarding the status of her test results.

“It is the nurses who keep briefing me on what is happening around because I’ve never seen any reason to step outside my isolation ward,” she said.

She revealed that she was very upset when she was informed of the death of Mr Mark Mbua, a former chairman of the Mombasa Golf Club, whom she learnt had been in the room next to hers in the ward.

The Late Mark Mbua

“I keep counting the number of days left because I cannot wait leave this place and return to my normal life. I want to mourn my mother, but only after I finish fighting this battle,” she said.

US scholar says two-metre distance too short

A US professor has dismissed the two-metre distance rule as not enough to give protection from Covid-19, saying it is based on old science.

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology researcher, Prof Lydia Bouroiba, said the two-metre “social distancing” recommendation is too close – and that to avoid the virus, people have to keep much farther – possibly eight metres.

“Although such social distancing strategies are critical in the current time of pandemic, it may seem surprising that the current understanding of the routes of hostto-host transmission in respiratory infectious diseases are predicated on a model of disease transmission developed in the 1930s that, by modern standards, seems overly simplified,” Prof Bouroiba says in her paper published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

She also warns that besides the cough and sneeze droplets, people have to be wary of “turbulent gas cloud” that traps and carries within it the virus.

“The locally moist and warm atmosphere within the turbulent gas cloud allows the contained droplets to evade evaporation for much longer than occurs with isolated droplets. Under these conditions, the lifetime of a droplet could be considerably extended by a factor of up to 1,000, from a fraction of a second to minutes,” says the professor who studies the fluid dynamics of disease transmission.

While her research had previously focused on flu, she says the current six-feet guideline is based on an assumption that viruses are transmitted only through droplets from coughs or sneezes.

The researcher says that there is not enough data on how the virus is spreading. At the moment, transmission is classified into large droplets, which fall closer to the affected person and smaller droplets, which evaporate before settling on a surface and which can be carried farther by the wind. The scholar says a powerful sneeze can send droplets flying more than the recommended two metres and that a gas cloud with the droplets can travel seven to eight metres.

“Moreover, throughout the trajectory, droplets of all sizes settle out or evaporate at rates that depend not only on their size, but also on the degree of turbulence and speed of the gas cloud, coupled with the properties of the environment (temperature, humidity and airflow).”

She says that “droplets that settle along the trajectory can contaminate surfaces, while the rest remain trapped and clustered in the moving cloud.”

“Eventually the cloud and its droplet payload lose momentum and coherence, and the remaining droplets within the cloud evaporate, producing residues or droplet nuclei that may stay suspended in the air for hours, following airflow patterns imposed by ventilation or climate- control systems,” she says.

Whether ventilation systems are also helping spread the virus is not known, but she says that a 2020 report from China “demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 particles could be found in the ventilation systems in hospital rooms of patients with Covid-19”.

While the WHO is currently recommending that healthcare workers should stay one metre from a person exhibiting coronavirus symptoms, the researcher says that “these distances are based on estimates of range that have not considered the possible presence of a high-momentum cloud carrying the droplets long distances.”

“For these and other reasons, wearing of appropriate personal protection equipment is vitally important for healthcare workers caring for patients who may be infected, even if they are farther than six feet away from a patient,” Prof Bouroiba says.

On whether masks can help filter the virus, she says they can reduce the spread from an infected person and for protection of the wearer.

But White House has dismissed her findings: “I’m sorry, but I was disturbed by that report because that’s misleading,” said Dr Anthony Fauci, a member of the White House task force.

For these and other reasons, wearing of appropriate personal protection equipment is vitally important for healthcare workers.”

By John Kamau, Daily Nation

I’ve just lost a job in Denmark because of this stubborn virus

Life makes an unexpected turn when in less than 12 hours you are out of a job and cannot leave your house.

Outside, people are scampering to supermarkets, panic-buying as if they are preparing to live in a post- apocalyptic world.

Paranoia gets the best of you. You are worried about touching door knobs, using washrooms or taking the bus, and are living in constant fear of being infected with Covid- 19, which has claimed nearly 5,000 lives globally. That is the situation I am in.

As a self-sponsored student living and studying in Denmark, I was accustomed to a hectic routine, waking up at 5am, working a four-hour shift and a rigorous academic programme, until three days ago, when I was abruptly confined to my room. That is when I began to grasp the scale of the problem.

On Wednesday evening, Denmark’s Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen announced that all schools and universities will remain closed for two weeks to contain the spread of the coronavirus.

Public sector employees working in critical departments of health and security were requested to remain in active duty.

However, employees in the private sector were encouraged to work from home. The Prime Minister also announced travel restrictions to countries classified as red zones and banned gatherings of more than 100 people, encouraging bars and hotels to close or restrict capacity.

Barely a minute after her statement, which was read in Danish, I watched my dorm mates’ emotions oscillate between fear and hope. The fear of being infected with the virus and the hope that the spread will be contained – but also the hope that if we contract the virus, we will recover.

I had been calm when the first case of coronavirus was reported in the country and remained relatively calm as the numbers continued to soar by the day. Work and study life continued as usual, and the feeling of normalcy was quite reassuring.

The Sunday before the lockdown, our Pastor, following an advisory from the Danish Health Authority, had started the sermon with a disclaimer: Do not shake hands, do not hug and make use of the hand sanitisers placed in the building.

This was later followed with posters put up by the Danish Health Authority all over campuses and cities asking residents to wash their hands frequently and to cough on their sleeves. Every day the situation escalated as more people tested positive for the virus, but people went around their life as usual until the lockdown and the attendant disruption.

By Friday morning, the Danish Health Authority reported that 674 people had been infected. But the lockdown aimed at curbing the spread has to some extent pushed the panic button.

Workers without a permanent salary are scratching their heads on how to raise money to cover their expenses, especially rent and other bills. Although the private sector has not been compelled to close down, most companies have asked their employees to stay home. The country’s welfare model is a safety net that ensures that people who lose their jobs are not pushed out of their homes or sleep hungry.

On Thursday, I received communication from my employer that they had reached the decision to close the restaurant for the next two weeks. This means that my colleagues and I will be out of work without pay for 14 days.

We are on contract and are only paid for hours worked.
Although the government has put in place safety measures to avert a food crisis, most Danes have been in a rush to hoard food and other home supplies, resulting in long queues similar to those in supermarkets in the run-up to Christmas.

A visit to the grocery store yesterday displayed a mixture of panic and anxiety, as everyone rushed to stock up on wheat flour, pasta, toilet paper and hand sanitisers.

Stores ran out of yeast and milk, as Danes worried that they might not be in a position to bake their own bread stocked up on these products, something that is reminiscent of World War II, when yeast was in low supply.

BY Daily Nation

Kenyan student happy to be home from China ‘hell’

When Bernard Muthuri boarded the Ethiopian Airways flight ET318 to Nairobi three weeks ago, he had no idea what was awaiting him.

In the wee hours of the morning, Mr Muthuri started his journey home from Xi’an city, China.

Eight hours later, with an hour’s layover at Bole International Airport in Addis Ababa, he landed at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) on February 23 at 10.25am.

After a two-month lockdown in his hostel room at Changan University, the mechanical engineer was relieved to finally be home albeit Sh65,546 poorer.

Many Chinese cities have been quarantined following the outbreak of Covid-19.

Self-quarantine is increasingly being used across the world to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

Enough food But being home yet still isolated felt like eternity for Mr Muthuri.

His mother had bought him enough food to prepare his own meals. “It was like hell.

Some family members wanted to forcibly see me. I remember there’s a day my uncle came home drunk and almost broke into my room, saying, he doesn’t fear the virus.

“But my parents kept encouraging and praying for me until Monday when I completed my 14 days of isolation,” Mr Muthuri said.

His seclusion started a day after he left JKIA with his brother.

He believes Kenya has insufficient personnel and ways of dealing with the epidemic.

“Therefore, I made a personal decision not to expose anyone to coronavirus,” he said.

With three other Kenyan students who were in the same flight, they were required to minimise contact with other people and take precautions like washing their hands regularly, wearing masks, avoiding crowded places and minimising the use of public transport.

“Before leaving [China], we were asked to sign a consent form stating that we were in good health and that our temperatures were normal and had no fever,” he said.

The consent form seen by the Nation requires students to undertake protective measures and isolate themselves for two weeks upon returning to their countries.

“…International students from Chang’an University should understand and abide by the following contents,” the consent form reads in part.

When Mr Muthuri landed, his brother picked him up at the airport. He shared his masks and sanitisers with him to reduce chances of infection.

Towards the end of his self-isolation, the 28-year-old ran out of masks. He relied on phone calls and text messages whenever he needed something.

“There’s a day I had a normal cold, which made me think that I had contracted the virus. So you can imagine my relief when the cold disappeared after two days,” he said.

When a China Southern Airlines flight landed in Nairobi two weeks ago with 239 people, it triggered outrage among Kenyans, compelling the government to state that passengers would be under self-quarantine.

Academic supervisor However, Mr Muthuri said no health official has contacted him to follow-up on his condition.

“Apart from my academic supervisor, who is Chinese, no one else has contacted me.”

When he completed his isolation, Mr Muthuri was eager to meet his immediate family and relatives.

“It felt like I was being released from prison. My family held a thanksgiving party for me to thank God for bringing me back home safely.”

For Mr Muthuri who had been locked up in his hostel room for about two months before flying back home, 14 days was a small sacrifice.

“I was already used to staying locked up so it wasn’t a strange experience for me.

“The only difference is that I was home.”

By Elizabeth Merab

Watch family conduct virtual burial for their son after hospital detains body – VIDEO

The funeral service for the late 13-year-old Brian Kimani Njoroge who died on February 29 of Leukemia at the Gertrudes Children’s Hospital in Nairobi is currently underway at the ACK Saint Stephens Gatuikira in Ndenderu, Kiambu.

The family decided to conduct a virtual burial for the boy after the hospital, Gertrudes Hospital, detained his body over an outstanding medical bill of Sh13 million.

The church is filled by mourners from the neighbourhood, who have gathered to bid farewell to the child.

Pupils and teachers from neighbouring schools have also attended to condole with the family.

The eulogy. PHOTO | FRANCIS NDERITU

The original bill as at the time of boy’s death stood at Sh17.9 million. A fundraiser raised Sh1.7 million, schools raised about Sh470,000, NHIF catered for about Sh650,000 while Gertrudes waivered 10 percent of the bill, leaving a balance of Sh13m, according to Patrick Mbugua, the chairman of the burial and fundraising committee.

The hospital board meeting is reportedly today after the management failed to reach a decision. The family says it is waiting for the board’s decision.

The management had asked for collateral before releasing the body, which the family lacked.

The family is now asking for help in order to get the body before they can arrange burial plans.

The boy had been treated in India between September 2018 and May 2019, where two operations for bone marrow transplant were conducted. The family paid 13m for the procedures, courtesy of a series of fundraisers.

When he returned to Kenya in May last year, a thanksgiving service was conducted in the hope it was the end of tribulations, only for complications to recur three months later.

He was taken back to Gertrudes, where he spent five-and-a-half-months admitted mostly in ICU and HDU, till he died on February 29.

By Peter Mburu

Ill-fated Ethiopian aircraft crashed at speed of 926km/hr

On March 10, 2019, at 08:38, Ethiopian Airlines’ Flight 302 took off from Addis Ababa’s Bole International Airport bound for Jomo Kenyatta International Airport, Nairobi.

On board were 157 people including the two pilots, Captain Yared Getachew, 29, and First Officer Ahmednur Mohammed Omar, 29.

The Boeing 737-8 Max, also had five cabin crew and one In-Flight Security Officer.

At 08:36:12 the airplane lined up on the runway and a minute later, Mr Omar reported to tower that they were ready for take off and the Air Traffic Control issued take off clearance. The pilots were then advised to contact radar.

Shortly after lift off, the left Angle of Attack (AoA), a sensor that helps to avoid an aerodynamic stall, became erroneous.

The plane’s airspeed and altitude values from the left air data system began deviating from the corresponding right side values.

Faulty sensor At 08:39:30, the radar controller identified ET-302 and instructed it to climb 34,000 feet. At 8:39:51, the first faulty sensor activated, putting the plane on nose-down for nine seconds.

The pilot pulled to pitch up the airplane. At 8:40:22, the second automatic nose-down trim activated, pushing the plane, again, on a nosediving position.

This saw the plane’s ground proximity warning system sound “Don’t Sink!” For three seconds and “Pull Up!” Also displayed on its flight display for another three seconds.

At 08:40:43, the third nosedown sensor activated pushing the nose downwards.

Seven seconds later, Captain Getachew told the first officer “advise, we would like to maintain one four thousand. We have flight control problem.”

Mr Omar complied and the request was approved by air traffic control. Following the approval, the new target altitude of 14, 000 feet was set but the captain was unable to maintain the flight path and requested to return back to Bole airport.

At 08:43:21, the nose-down trim activated for about 5 seconds. This now saw the plane pitch at a 400 angle.

At this point the plane’s descent rate increased from 100 feet per minute to more than 5,000 feet per minute Warning At 08:43:36 the enhanced ground proximity warning system (sounded “Terrain … Terrain … Pull Up … Pull up …!” At 08:44, the aircraft hit the ground.

These details are part of a 130-page interim report released by the Ethiopian Aircraft Accident Investigation Bureau. They were released yesterday on the one-year anniversary of the crash, giving for the first time an inside look of what could have happened to Flight 302.

The report shows the aircraft plummeted to the ground at speeds of 500 feet per second, with its nose down at 400.

“At the end of the flight, computed airspeed values reached 926km/hr. Pitch values were greater than 400 nose down and descent rate values were greater than 33,000 feet per minute,” the report said.

“The aircraft impacted the terrain creating a crater approximately 10m deep, with a hole of about 28m width and 40m length. The damages to the aircraft are consistent with high energy impact,” added the report.

In their findings, the Ethiopian investigators have singled out faulty systems on Boeing 737 MAX as the leading cause of the crash, concentrating on the technical elements of the flight.

By Allan Olingo

Meet Nadia Abdalla the youngest CAS in Uhuru’s cabinet

“I have not held such an office before.

When I came here for the first time, it was unbelievable. I was appointed into this position when I was three months into my job as the Chief Tourism officer in the Mombasa County Government.

Life happens. Isn’t it confounding how a particular moment can change the entire trajectory of your life? Here, I am. On a different career path and living in Nairobi for the first time.

The city is fast. I have had to acquaint myself with an early morning alarm clock and get used to the traffic jam. Except for a breakout on my face, I can say that I have settled in well.

I was born and brought up in Marikiti, Oldtown, Mombasa. If you ask of my childhood story, I was that little girl who was not afraid to speak her mind, ask questions or do what I thought was right. I used my voice to communicate or amplify a particular issue. At the age of 13, I drew inspiration from the late Kofi Annan and saw the zeal and power of Oprah Winfrey in me. That is why I decided to pursue a bachelor’s degree in public relations and mass communications. For my Master’s degree, I studied International Relations and Cultural Diplomacy.

Before the CAS appointment, I was working on something else and to be honest, I did not see myself in the national government. I vividly remember how it all happened. I was having a plate of ‘viazi’ when my phone beeped then buzzed.

Everything was happening fast— my phone was blowing up.

“I need to know your full name. I know you by Nadia Naddy (that is how most people knew me), but what is your real name? The caller sounded frantic. I just gave him my full name as Nadia Ahmed Abdalla. He then informed me that the President had appointed me as the Chief Administrative Secretary (CAS) ICT Ministry, Youth Affairs and Innovation. He was sending me a video. I watched it. It was unbelievable. I could hear butterflies in my stomach. I lost appetite for the viazi.

At that particular moment, I did not even know what that role entailed, it could have been a call to a board or something but the fact that the

President had mentioned my name was mind-blowing. I am honoured and privileged to be here. My role is to equip, empower, protect and involve the youth in decision and policymaking and implementation.

About three months ago, I was just a girl who was trying to be different in her own space then in the next moment, the entire country was interested in knowing more about me. I was the youngest of the appointees— 28 years. My twitter and Instagram feeds were flooded.

Now, when I go to Mombasa, I can no longer be myself. On those streets unlike here in Nairobi where I am having a normal life, people know my identity and the position I hold. Mheshimiwa! They call out.

I come from a family that believes in owning their own identities. I was brought up in a set up in which my mother and aunties did what they felt was right. My mother divorced when I was one and even after she remarried, she did not lose the ardour for a better life. I get my drive partly from her. I could see the potential she had only that it was limited to her children.

I wanted to go beyond. I wanted to do something to tackle the challenges that women and the youth face.

After my Master’s degree in Berlin, I came back to Mombasa and I held events for youth and women. I equipped them with communication skills, we discussed matters mental health and I was a link between women going through domestic abuse and psychologists.

‘She is doing this for attention,’ rumours spread.

When I uploaded my photos on social media, others were quick to read a motive.

‘She wants to attract men,’ some women said. I did not let this stop me.

It amplified the phrase, ‘be your own vibe.’ I was unstoppable and maximised my space on the social media platforms and on the ground. I believe the fact that I am not afraid to make my voice heard and my contribution in shaping the lives of the youth and women is what made the President’s to appoint me.

Even in business, I believed in going the extra mile. To enable me to organise events, I had many hustles, selling branded environment- friendly water bottles, scarves, and my book. It’s called the Feminist in Us published in 2017. The book addresses misconceptions about the feminist movement in the hope of driving support for women causes.

In 2019, I was the Mombasa representative of the show Ms. President that aired on KTN. It featured women change-makers from the various communities.

Why did I apply to be part of the show?
I wanted to prove a point. That women like me, read young, Muslim and from the Coast can lead and bring about positive change. Though I got eliminated, the experience made me hungry to do more and to maintain the journey that I had already started.

With my current position, my intent is to give young people and women a space to voice their views and ideas. A few weeks ago, I did a pilot for the program ‘Kenya is me dialogue’ in Mombasa. The program will be in the form of public barazas where the youth and women get to share their views and be listened to. I will then use their views to shape policy.

As we celebrate the International Women’s Day tomorrow, I urge women not to focus so much on preserving their femininity but rather fight to create something and to bring positive change.

When it comes to you being a woman and feminine, harness the power and be your own vibe.”

Daily Nation

BY LILYS NJERU

You’re seen before you’re heard, Havi explains why he wears a Sh600,000 watch

In a contest of spruceness, Nelson Havi runs away with a medal. In a black suit paired with a blue shirt, a Law Society of Kenya (LSK) badge punched into his coat and a maroon striped tie fastened with sleek perfection, Havi looks his usual pristine self.

The new LSK president wears a Montblanc watch that cost him Sh600,000.

One of his university lecturers Prof PLO Lumumba called him “the duke” to appreciate his sense of fashion.

“Light travels faster than sound; you’re seen before you’re heard.

Business Daily

As a lawyer, you must be meticulous,” he says with his habitual winsome grin.

“The mind is always eager to pay attention to a presentable person.”

And that attention is priceless in the legal practice. For two months, Havi traversed the country to meet lawyers in town halls to sell his agenda. He tells me this tough trail left him worn, bruised and with life lessons.

“I’m slowly returning to my routine,” he says.

To wind down, the 43-year-old exercises an hour in the morning and in the evening twice every week.

“I also read a lot of African literature, Shakespearean plays, fiction and religious mythology.”

To young unmarried men, Havi says that while marriage takes away some freedoms, it doesn’t cost one’s social life entirely.

“My shoes have been shining like this since I got married,” he says, motioning me to peek at his glossy boots, the deft work of his wife. “I don’t understand how she polishes them. She does it, not as a sense of duty, but for love.”

BY JAMES KAHONGEH

Death Annoucement of Paul Kinuthia Mastu (Poli) of Allen, Texas

It is with profound sadness and humble acceptance that we announce the untimely death of Paul Kinuthia Mastu (Poli) on Sunday, 23rd February 2020 in Allen, Texas.

Son of the late Mastu Aflatoon and Mary Wangoi and step-son of Mary Wambui. Grandson of the late Pritam Aflatoon Singh. Son-in-law of Mr. Abeeli Katongole and Jane Nagayi of Kampala. Husband of Rosette Nampija.

Father of Ariana Wangoi, Aaliyah Nagai and Mastu Aflatoon. Family of Adija (Kore), Jamilla (JB), the late Kishore, the late Cecilia (Tipsy), Shahin Mastu and Fozia Mastu.

To help offset the huge repatriation and funeral expenses, family, friends and well-wishers are meeting daily at Kenya Motorsport Hall South C from 6pm and his mother’s home in Kiserian, Olteani from 3pm.

A major fundraiser has been scheduled for Saturday, 7th March at Mama Paul’s Home in Kiserian, Olteani from 12pm.

Financial Support can be sent to Safaricom Till No: 5123867 and Account name Paul Kinuthia Mastu. For further info contact 0722748470/ 0720402564.

Burial date to be communicated later

In God’s hands you rest, in our hearts you will live forever.

Rest in Eternal Peace Poli.

BY Daily Nation

How my late mother secured our financial future fully

When Sylvia Wariara’s mother passed on three years ago, it was the most devastating phase in her life. Her mother died in a road accident when Sylvia was in college and her younger sister, Catherine Wanjira, was in high school.

Soon after their mother was buried, they received a phone call from a stranger informing them of a trust fund she had left for them.

“We got a call from a Mr Michael Ndung’u in 2017 around April. He told us there was a trust fund our mother had left us and that if we needed anything we should call him and they would sort us out,” narrates Sylvia Sylvia recalls that six months before her mother passed away, she had revealed to them that they would never struggle even if she died as she had already secured their future. That call confirmed all the best laid plans that their mother had been telling them.

By definition, a trust fund is set up by a grantor for the benefit of another individual who is regarded as the beneficiary. It may comprise of investments, cash, real estate or other assets that can ensure future financial security of the child or grandchild in some instances. By rule of the thumb, such funds cater for the immediate needs of the beneficiary such as education, medical, food and others.

“The beneficiary does not own the trust property, but has the right to receive the benefit of the property as the trust allows. For example, a child can receive payments for college fees, upkeep or medical care. The trustee is responsible for managing the property owned by the trust. Think of trustees as the corporate officers. A trustee can be an individual or an organisation,” says David Ngava, Octagon Africa Pension Administrator.

Accessing the funds

At first, they had to go to the office with their aunty, who was their guardian since Sylvia had not yet attained the legal age of 18 years. Kenyan law considers people below 18 years old not capable of making life changing decisions. A guardian who had been appointed by the deceased shall act in the best interest of the minor until the minor comes of age. This request for payments shall be received and reviewed by the trustees.

“We were not allowed to access the money anyhow. We had to have a convincing reason why I needed it. Then we would draft a letter to the accountant, who would then present it to the CEO. They ask a lot of questions before the money is approved,” explains Sylvia.

Once Sylvia reached 18 years old, she was given authority to have money deposited in her account monthly.

According to David, when the funds are in a trust, they are invested by the trustees prudently and at the same time pay-outs are made from the trust depending on the prevailing needs and demands of the beneficiaries. Approval for access of funds is given by the trustee. Sylvia and her younger sister receive a monthly salary to cater for their monthly shopping and all other monthly expenses.

Uninterrupted life

They are glad that the trust fund has saved them from the trouble of people in the name of guardians coming up to claiming their mother’s money. They were able to honour their mothers wish of adding extra rooms to their rental property with the guidance of the trust. They are also thankful for the invaluable financial lessons they have been taught by the trust.

“We are able to travel during the holidays as well as learn how to save and plan for our future, thanks to our late mother. She made sure our lives continue normally,” she says Her mother had insurance too before she passed on, which they used to cater for her funeral expenses. Sylvia’s late mother would tell her about the chamas she was involved in and what happened in those meetings, so they were able to seamlessly pick from where she left.

When it comes to investing the funds, the trust has invested in various asset classes both long and short term from Treasury bonds, Treasury bills, quoted equities and fixed deposit. This diversification ensures fund investments are stable and sustainable into the future.

The duration of the trust fund is based on the injections, interest and withdrawal of funds. When Sylvia finds a job, she plans to request the trust to stop the monthly payments so that they can cater for their needs with it as the cash is invested in other projects.

“It’s good to tell your children about investment groups and pension funds you have enrolled in. As much as they are afraid that when they know they will waste it, such information opens their mind and should anything happen to you, they will be taken care of. You child too can start investing in such and make better financial decisions,” she concludes.

By HARRIET JAMES